October 21, 2021

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Department of Justice Seizes $2.3 Million in Cryptocurrency Paid to the Ransomware Extortionists Darkside

9 min read
<div>The Department of Justice today announced that it has seized 63.7 bitcoins currently valued at over $2.3 million.</div>
The Department of Justice today announced that it has seized 63.7 bitcoins currently valued at over $2.3 million.

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