October 21, 2021

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Department of Justice Redoubles Efforts to Find and Prosecute Those Responsible for the 2001 Murder of Federal Prosecutor Tom Wales

22 min read
<div>Deputy Attorney General Lisa O. Monaco today announced that the Department of Justice has doubled the $1 million reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the October 2001 murder of Seattle Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Wales.</div>
Deputy Attorney General Lisa O. Monaco today announced that the Department of Justice has doubled the $1 million reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of those responsible for the October 2001 murder of Seattle Assistant U.S. Attorney Thomas Wales.

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