October 21, 2021

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Denial of Democracy in Hong Kong

14 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The Chinese government continues to undermine the democratic institutions of Hong Kong, denying Hong Kong residents the rights that the People’s Republic of China (PRC) itself has guaranteed.  The Hong Kong Legislative Council (LegCo) passage on May 27 of new measures that alter the composition of the LegCo and Election Commission severely constrains people in Hong Kong from meaningfully participating in their own governance and having their voices heard.

Decreasing Hong Kong residents’ electoral representation will not foster long-term political and social stability for Hong Kong.  This legislation defies the Basic Law’s clear acknowledgment that the ultimate objective is the election of all members of the LegCo by universal suffrage.  We once again call on the PRC and the Hong Kong authorities to allow the voices of all Hong Kongers to be heard.  We also call on these authorities to release and drop charges against all individuals charged under the National Security Law and other laws merely for standing for election or for expressing dissenting views.  The United States stands united with our allies and partners in speaking out for the human rights and fundamental freedoms guaranteed to the people in Hong Kong by the Sino-British Joint Declaration and the Basic Law.

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