September 27, 2021

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Declining Media Pluralism in Hungary

11 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

We are deeply concerned about declining media pluralism in Hungary. The imminent loss of the broadcasting license of one of the country’s most popular radio stations, Klubradio, threatens the departure of yet another independent voice from Hungary’s airwaves. The United States shares the concerns of international press freedom advocates and many Hungarians over the decline of media pluralism in Hungary.

The United States believes that a diversity of independent voices and opinions is essential to democracy, and we urge the Government of Hungary to promote an open media environment. The United States is committed to strengthening our partnership with Hungary, a NATO Ally, and advancing the Biden administration’s commitment to supporting democratic institutions, human rights, and the rule of law.

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