October 18, 2021

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Death of Former Algerian President Bouteflika

17 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States offers condolences on the death of former Algerian President Abdelaziz Bouteflika.  He played a consequential role in Algeria’s history serving in the National Liberation Army, fighting for Algeria’s independence, and as Foreign Minister.  As President, Mr. Bouteflika helped lead Algeria out of its Dark Decade.  The United States remains committed to its close partnership with Algeria and deepening the relationship between the American and Algerian people.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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