October 19, 2021

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Curaçao Independence Day

15 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the people and Government of the United States of America, I congratulate the people of Curaçao as you celebrate Curaçao Day.

The longstanding friendship between our two countries is rooted in our shared values and cultural ties based on rule of law and support for democracy.  Working together in partnership, we will overcome the COVID-19 pandemic, tackle the climate crisis, and build back a better economy. Despite the pandemic, our joint law enforcement efforts, including the largest aerial counter narcotics deployment in 10 years, continue to disrupt the nefarious activities of narcotraffickers. Additionally, we have furthered our joint initiative to promote English language education in public schools, which builds lasting bridges between cultures and expands economic opportunity.

I wish the people of Curaçao a happy Curaçao Day and looking forward to our continued partnership.

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