October 21, 2021

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Côte d’Ivoire National Day

8 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I join the people of Côte d’Ivoire as they celebrate their Independence Day.

The United States values our strong, cooperative relationship with Côte d’Ivoire.  This year, we will work together to end the COVID-19 pandemic, strengthen democracy, and promote economic opportunities and success for all Ivoirians.  We support Côte d’Ivoire’s cooperation with its neighbors to address the climate crisis and to ensure regional security.  The United States will remain a steadfast and reliable partner as we work together to advance these shared priorities.

The United States and the American people wish the people of Côte d’Ivoire prosperity and happiness on the occasion of your 61st year as an independent nation over the years to come.

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