October 21, 2021

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Condemning the October 3 Houthi Missile Attack

10 min read

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The United States condemns the October 3 Houthi missile attack on the densely populated neighborhood of al-Rawdha in Marib, Yemen, which killed two children and injured an estimated 33 civilians, including women and children, according to UN agencies.  Civilians will suffer as long as the brutal Houthi military offensives continue.  There is an international consensus that now is the time to end the conflict, and the Republic of Yemen Government and Saudi Arabia have committed to stop fighting and resume political talks.  The Houthis are standing in the way of peace.

Since the beginning of the year, the Houthis have intensified their attacks, both inside Yemen and against Saudi Arabia, endangering the lives of civilians, including more than 70,000 U.S. citizens living in Saudi Arabia.  These actions exacerbate Yemen’s humanitarian crisis, which has already reached historic proportions.

We call on the Houthis to stop fighting and engage in UN-led talks to bring an end to this devastating war.

More from: Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

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