Condemning the Assassination of Abdul Wase Ghafari

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States condemns the assassination of Abdul Wase Ghafari, the father of Mayor Zarifa Ghafari, in Kabul. Since I awarded Mayor Ghafari the International Women of Courage Award in March 2020, she has survived two assassination attempts. We extend our deepest condolences to Mayor Ghafari, her family, and her community.

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