Briefing with European and Eurasian Affairs Acting Assistant Secretary Philip T. Reeker on the Secretary’s Upcoming Travel to Belgium

Philip T. Reeker, Acting Assistant SecretaryBureau of European and Eurasian Affairs

Via Teleconference

MR ICE:  Thank you.  Good morning, everyone, and thank you for joining us.  I’d like to welcome you to this call previewing Secretary Blinken’s trip to Belgium coming up next week.  We, of course, announced this trip officially just this morning.  Just a quick reminder, this call is on the record, but the contents are embargoed until the call is completed.  I’ll also just quickly note that we’re going to stay on topic today and only answer questions related to the trip.  A transcript of this call will be posted on state.gov later today.

At this point, I’d like to let you know that Acting Assistant Secretary Philip Reeker for the Bureau of European and Eurasian Affairs here at the State Department will be your briefer today.  Ambassador Reeker will give an overview the trip and then take a few questions.  Okay.  With that, it is now my pleasure to hand it over to Acting Assistant Secretary Reeker to begin.  Ambassador Reeker.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Hey, thank you, J.T.  Hello, everybody.  Nice to be back with you.  And obviously, as you know, Secretary Blinken is going to travel to Belgium, specifically to Brussels, March 22nd through 25th to attend the NATO Ministerial.  This will be his first trip to Europe as Secretary and the first in-person meeting for the Secretary with our allies and partners.  First and foremost, an opportunity to underscore our commitment to revitalizing ties with NATO, which of course, as you know, is the premier forum for transatlantic security.  Following the ministerial itself, the 23rd and 24th, the Secretary will meet with leaders from the European Union, and also a meeting with Belgium’s Foreign Minister and the Deputy Prime Minister Wilmes.

I think you all know and have heard from the President and the Secretary how important NATO and the Europeans are as crucial partners on important U.S. goals, from upholding the rules-based international order that governs our international system to recovery from the COVID pandemic and the economic progress.  We need to work together coming out of this pandemic.  Secretary Blinken is very eager to meet with his counterparts, all 29 other foreign ministers from the NATO Allies, as well as NATO Secretary General Jens Stoltenberg.  And as I said, this is his first trip to Europe as Secretary.

So the 23rd and 24th are the official days of the NATO Foreign Ministerial.  He’ll have a chance to meet all of the counterparts there, and as I said, the secretary general, clearly underscoring the Biden administration’s determination to strengthen and reinvigorate our transatlantic ties with these NATO Allies.  The Secretary is looking forward to this ministerial to address some of these common challenges, ones that we can only solve together.  So it’ll be an opportunity for the Secretary and the foreign ministers to discuss the NATO 2030 initiative, proposals under that for alliance adaptation, concerns over China and Russia, as well as climate change, cybersecurity, hybrid threats, combating terrorism, energy security – clearly the global pandemic enters into this, and other common challenges that we face together.

Separately, Secretary Blinken will then meet with European leaders, including the European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen, and his counterpart, the EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy Josep Borrell.  As we face a critical challenge in rebuilding the global economy from the effects of COVID-19, advancing and strengthening these European partnerships are going to be essential for the economic recovery.  The Secretary is going to also consult with the European Union on how we can work together on the basis of our shared values to address global challenges that come from Iran, Russia, and China.  In his meeting with the Belgian Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs Sophie Wilmes, the Secretary is going to underscore the strength of the bilateral relationship and discuss similar issues of global importance.  He will also thank the Belgians for their important partnership on vaccine production, and, of course, thank Belgium for hosting the NATO headquarters.

The Secretary will have an opportunity to participate in a virtual what we call “meet and greet” with his State Department team serving at the missions to the European Union and to NATO, as well as our U.S. Embassy Brussels, the embassy to Belgium.  This is one of our largest platforms in Europe, this tri-mission platform, and it will be an opportunity for the Secretary to express his thanks to the team for all the preparation they’ve been doing in advance of this visit and, frankly, for the work they do every day to advance U.S. foreign policy priorities in Europe, underscoring our shared values, our security priorities, and our shared prosperity.

I will note that while in Belgium, the Secretary will deliver an important foreign policy speech focused on his commitment to rebuilding and revitalizing alliances broadly.  He’ll highlight the importance of NATO, the ministerial he will have just completed, and the transatlantic relationship more broadly.

As I’ve said already, that transatlantic relationship is built on a foundation of shared values and the commitment to democracy, the rule of law, respect for human rights, economic opportunity, and the pursuit of prosperity and security.  And it just goes to underscore that this relationship is really the cornerstone of an unprecedented period of peace and prosperity for Europe, and the broad transatlantic region over the last 75 years.

So with that, why don’t I turn it back to JT?  And happy to take your questions for a little while.  Thanks.

MR ICE:  Thank you, Ambassador Reeker.  With that, we’ll go ahead and take a few questions.  Why don’t we start with Matt Lee of the Associated Press?  Matt.

QUESTION:  (Inaudible) you hear me?

MR ICE:  Yeah, we got you.

QUESTION:  Okay, cool.  So Phil, I hate to put you on the spot – although I’m going to enjoy putting you on the spot, but I’m going – (laughter) – and so I’m going to do it anyway – you were the – you’ve been in the position for some time now.  And I’m just wondering what you think is the difference between the Trump administration and the Biden administration in terms of dealing with Europe and its allies.  As you’ll well remember, then Secretary Pompeo went to Brussels and delivered a speech at the Marshall Foundation which basically trashed kind of all of the things that you’ve just been talking about.

So how do you expect this trip and these interactions to be different than what they were over the last couple years?  Thanks.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Thanks, Matt.  Just the kind of question I would have expected from you.  And of course, I’ll let you write your own analysis of the differences you’ll see.  I think you’ve already seen in the speeches that Secretary Blinken has made, in his engagements, the comments that we’ve made after his engagements with European counterparts, the speeches by the President.  And just looking at the interim guidance on the national security that was released, that there’s a real focus, first of all, on alliances, repairing relationships, revitalizing alliances, and in the transatlantic space, re-exploring what we can do, reimagining things we can do together to meet the challenges of this era, including the COVID pandemic, obviously, and the economic recovery we’ll need after that.

NATO is the strongest military alliance in history, and it’s now 72 years and going strong, adapting itself to new threats.  It is an alliance focused on defense of a space.  The importance of the Article 5 commitment of mutual defense is unshakeable.  The President has made that clear, the Secretary has made that clear, and I’m sure you will hear that again in the engagements in Brussels.

We consult very closely on common security challenges with all of our NATO Allies.  During the past year, we saw NATO reach 30 allies with the accession of North Macedonia as the most recent ally, and – making clear that the open door has been a successful policy for those countries that choose a NATO path and do the hard work required to meet the alliance’s requirements in that sense.

I think we’re going to be focused on strengthening the alliance’s capacity to counter Russia, the continuing threats of terrorism, and, of course, emerging and disruptive technologies, cyber and hybrid threats.  That also includes, I would mention, misinformation and disinformation campaigns, weaponized corruption – these are all things that the Secretary and the President have already identified as priorities for the administration.

I think the Biden administration has been very clear that its commitment to ensuring that NATO’s door remains open is part of our firm policy.  And just a reminder that NATO itself was founded on the principles of democracy and individual liberty and the rule of law, and it’s the shared values that make our society stronger.  And NATO itself is stronger and has lasted and thrived for 72 years because it’s an alliance grounded in democratic values, not transactions or threats.

And I’d just finish by saying very clearly under the Biden administration, the United States will be a steady and unflinching ally.  We know we’re stronger and better able to overcome challenges when we face them together, and we’re going to modernize our alliances, mend them as needed, and deal with the world as we face it.  So I’ll leave it at that.

MR ICE:  Okay.  Let’s go to the line of Jennifer Hansler at CNN.  Jennifer.

QUESTION:  Hi, thanks so much for doing this.  So you mentioned Iran.  I was wondering if you could get into any more detail about what those conversations will look like.  And then separately how much do you expect Turkey to factor into the conversations in Brussels?  Does Secretary Blinken intend to have any sort of pull-aside with the foreign minister?  Thank you.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  I have to say I’m sorry, the second question you were really garbled.  I didn’t hear it.

QUESTION:  Oh.  Can you hear me?

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Yeah.  Can you just speak maybe a little more clearly?

QUESTION:  Sure, sorry.  I’m on the street.  Does the Secretary intend to have any sort of pull‑aside with his Turkish counterpart and how much do you expect issues with Turkey to come up in the conversations in Brussels?

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Great.  So on your first question, this is not specifically about Iran, but obviously, we continue to believe that meaningful diplomacy to achieve a mutual return to the JCPOA is the right way forward.  I’d just note, as I think you’ve heard from others, that unfortunately Iran has so far continued to take steps in excess of JCPOA limits instead of actually engaging in the diplomatic process that’s been offered.  And so I think the Secretary will clearly have an opportunity to discuss that certainly with EU colleagues and with others who will be there.

On the Turks, obviously Turkey is a very valued, longstanding NATO ally.  We have a lot of shared interests in counting terrorism – countering terrorism – ending the conflict in Syria, for instance, and deterring other malign influences in the region.  I don’t have any specific pull‑asides or other meetings to announce at this point, but clearly, I’d let the Turkish Government announce the – their attendance and plans for the ministerial.  But clearly all the ministers will be there or their representatives and we’ll have an opportunity for the first time in a long time to meet in person.  And as we started the briefing, this is the Secretary’s first opportunity to meet with all of his NATO counterparts there in Brussels in person.

MR ICE:  Okay, let’s go to the line of Nick Wadhams at Bloomberg.  Nick.

QUESTION:  Hi, thanks, Phil.  I just have a two-part question.  You guys keep talking a lot about revitalizing alliances, but I’m wondering what your message is going to be to those countries that were perfectly happy with the alliance relationship under President Trump, including Poland and Hungary and to some extent Turkey.  And then second, what are you saying to allies like Germany that don’t necessarily want to play ball on some of your priorities like Nord Stream 2 and NATO spending?  Do you have any new initiatives or plans to get countries to spend more of their budgets on defense?  Thanks.

MR ICE:  Ambassador Reeker, perhaps you’re on mute.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Yep, thank you.  I was indeed.  Let me start over.  Certainly the idea of the ministerial and why we have these things is an opportunity for all of the ministers to gather to focus on the alliance, and each of the ministerial sessions will have a different focus in terms of priority issues.  I mentioned the NATO 2030 proposals and ideas for adaptation and how the alliance remains up to date and addressing the most current and pressing challenges, and there’s an opportunity there to share different points of view and different perspectives.

I think the mere fact that the alliance has thrived and done so much to provide this remarkable and historic geographic space but also a space of values and prosperity for so long speaks for itself through many challenges, ups and downs of the history of the last three-quarters of a century.  And we are dedicated to continuing to underscore the U.S. role and leadership at NATO be that underscoring Article 5 but also Article 3.  And this is a good chance to discuss those things with all of our allies both collectively and in the opportunities we’ll have individually.  So I think I’ll just leave it at that.

It’s something the Secretary very much looks forward to.  He’s been able to speak remotely, of course, and virtually with a number of counterparts, including the German foreign minister.  But this will be a chance to actually see each other in person even as we practice good protocols for COVID-19, but are able to review and, as the Secretary has made very clear, revitalize our contacts, our broad alliance, and look at all of the challenges we share together.

MR ICE:  Okay.  Let’s go to the line, please, of Cyril Julien at AFP.

QUESTION:  Hello.

MR ICE:  Yes, Cyril.  Go ahead.

QUESTION:  Yes.  Thank – yes, thank you for doing this.  I have a question about Afghanistan.  Will Secretary Blinken inform his NATO Allies of the U.S. decision in regard to the troops withdrawal or will it be the – this issue will be subject to discussion with his allies?

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  As you know, I think even today the United States is continuing to work very closely with the region and with international partners to support Afghan-led, Afghan-owned peace negotiations.  And the goal here is to bring to an end this 40 years of conflict in Afghanistan.  I can’t preview any of the discussions the Secretary will have.  Obviously, Afghanistan and NATO’s role there will be a topic at the ministerial.  The U.S. remains very committed to continued close consultation with NATO Allies and other partners in the Resolute Support mission.

As our review of Afghanistan policy continues, I know we’ve had briefings and updates with the North Atlantic Council this week already.  And it’ll clearly be a topic in the discussions at the ministerial.  I’d just underscore that the commitment we have – that we reaffirmed at the NATO Defense Ministerial which was held, of course, virtually just a few weeks ago – that commitment remains true.  We went in together.  We will adjust together as we have over the years.  And when the time is right, we will leave together.

MR ICE:  Okay.  Well, let’s please go to the line of Michele Kelemen of NPR.  Michele?

QUESTION:  Wondering if you’re looking for any kind of specific action with the Europeans on Russia.  And also you didn’t mention Belarus.  I wonder if you’re expecting any sort of diplomacy on that, and what’s the status of Ambassador Fisher?  Thanks.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Thanks, Michele.  Look, we expect – even as you’ve seen in recent days – our relationship with Russia to remain a challenge.  Clearly, NATO is very aware of that.  And it is one that I think we’re prepared for.  Our goal, as the President has made clear, the Secretary has said it, is to have a relationship with Russia that is predictable and stable.  And where there are opportunities for it to be constructive and it’s in our interest, we will pursue them.

But certainly given Russia’s conduct in recent months and years, there will also be adversarial elements, as the Secretary has underscored, and we’re not going to shy away from those.  So I think they’ll be clearly discussion about Russia at the NATO Ministerial and in the margins.  The – we’ll engage with our allies to discuss different views of Russia and how we can engage with Russia in ways that obviously advance our collective interests but remain very clear-eyed about the challenges that Russia poses.

On Belarus, this is a subject that I expect will be discussed with our EU – in our EU meetings.  We have clearly shared a condemnation of the Lukashenko regime there in Belarus for its use of violent and very repressive tactics against the peaceful protesters.  We have joined together in sanctions and also calling for an end to this crackdown, the release of an enormous number of political prisoners, and of course, the conduct of free and fair elections.

I think we’ve all been inspired by the Belarusian people, especially the Belarusian women who have peacefully demonstrated for the right to have a role in Belarus’s future, to have a government that actually delivers for them.  And our European partners have very much joined us in that.

Ambassador Julie Fisher, who is our ambassador to Belarus and brings a real wealth of knowledge and experience, has been in close contact with many of these allies.  She traveled in Europe some weeks ago to Vilnius, to Warsaw, to Stockholm, to meet with the representatives of the protest movement, as well as with our partners and allies, and consult on these issues.  We’re working through a multi-step process to determine how best to deploy Ambassador Fisher and how she can undertake responsibilities in Belarus, and we’ll keep you posted on that process.

But certainly, we continue to stand with so many around Europe who support the brave Belarusian people who are simply asking to have a government that actually delivers for them and that represents their views, and we will continue to stand up for the people of Belarus and all those around the world who face this kind of brutality as they seek to exercise democratic freedoms.

MR ICE:  Okay.  Let’s go to the line of Rosiland Jordan at Al Jazeera.  Rosiland.

QUESTION:  (Inaudible) call.  This may dovetail with conversations involving Russia.  But I’m wondering about NATO’s current perspective on the changing Arctic.  How is the alliance looking at engaging with other Arctic nations – Canada, Russia in particular – on protecting it, on using it for military purposes, on using it for commercial purposes?  Is that going to be any part of the conversation next week?  Thank you.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Thanks for the question.  The Arctic is certainly, as you note, an important region.  It comes to the fore when talking about climate, which has been a major priority for the Biden administration, as you know.  I can underscore that the United States envisions the Arctic region as one that’s free of conflict and where nations act responsibly, where the economic and energy resources are developed in a sustainable and transparent manner, and of course, with respect to the environment and also keeping in mind the interests and cultures of indigenous people there.  So it’s really a comprehensive approach that we’re seeking to the Arctic region, and we give it – give attention to a full range of interests.  There’s security and climate, sustainable development.  There are scientific cooperation and programs that go on.

So I don’t think there’s a specific focus on the Arctic at these meetings.  The premier forum, really, for discussing matters of Arctic governance is the Arctic Council.  That’s made up of the eight Arctic states – the United States, of course, Canada, the Kingdom of Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, the Russian Federation, and Sweden, in alphabetical order.  And they will – we expect to have a meeting later in the spring without any details pinned down yet of the Arctic Council, a ministerial-level meeting.  And that’s a forum that we have used, I think very successfully, over many years to deal with these Arctic issues.

So that remains a priority for us, and those conversations go on frequently.  We’ve got experts here within the bureau but also across the State Department – from our Bureau of Oceans, Environment, and Science; obviously, the Western Hemisphere Bureau is involved – that focus very much on the Arctic.

MR ICE:  Okay.  Let’s go to the line of Jessica Donati at The Wall Street Journal.

QUESTION:  Hi.  I just wanted to go back to Afghanistan.  When you said the NATO defense minister meeting, they were actually hoping for the U.S. to make a decision because, as we all know, it’s the U.S. that’s going to make the final call on troops.  So I was wondering whether EU country – NATO countries will get a response on whether to keep troops beyond May 1st after the NATO Ministerial next week.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  I don’t have anything more to add to what I said already.  I think it answered the question.  We’ll continue to focus on this, and what we said at the time of the NATO Defense Ministerial remains very true.

MR ICE:  Okay.  And I think we have time for one more question.  Let’s go to the line of Christiane Jacke at the German Press Agency.

QUESTION:  Yeah, hello.  Can you hear me?

MR ICE:  Yes, we can hear you.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Yes, indeed.

QUESTION:  Great, thank you.  Thanks a lot for taking my question.  One very quick thing on the timeline:  Is the meeting with Ursula von der Leyen and Josep Borrell on the 24th or shortly before the departure on the 25th?

And also, the speech that you mentioned, is that just his speech at the ministerial or a separate speech he’s going to deliver?

And a very quick follow-up on Nord Stream 2:  When meeting his German counterpart Heiko Mass, will the Secretary bring up the issue of possible sanctions for German companies as there is more and more pressure from Republicans in Congress on this matter?  Thank you very much.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Well, thanks for the questions.  I think I’ll leave it to the traveling party to announce scheduling specifically, but we previewed the meetings that are expected to happen; just can’t give you the exact times at this point.  The Secretary will deliver a speech outside of the context of the NATO Ministerial, where obviously he will have interventions in each of the sessions there.  But his foreign policy speech will focus on the broader concept of rebuilding and revitalizing alliances more general.  NATO is, of course, our primary alliance and, as I said, the most successful alliance in history.

I don’t want to prejudge what will happen in any particular meeting.  I think you saw the statement that the Secretary put out yesterday that related to Nord Stream 2.  I’ll just let that speak for itself, and obviously, as we indicated, this is an opportunity to see all 30 NATO foreign ministers, including the Secretary of State, together, in person, for the first time.  And they’ll have a chance to engage with each other on a full range of issues.

MR ICE:  Great.  Ladies and gentlemen, that’s all the time that we have for today.  I do want to take this opportunity to thank Acting Assistant Secretary Reeker for joining with us.  We very much appreciate it and we also appreciate everyone who dialed in today.

With that, the briefing is ended and the embargo is lifted.  Have a great weekend.

AMBASSADOR REEKER:  Thanks, J.T.  Thanks, everyone.  Bye.

More from: Philip T. Reeker, Acting Assistant SecretaryBureau of European and Eurasian Affairs

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    The Justice Department today announced that Ronald Wyatt, 22, pleaded guilty today in U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Michigan to intentionally threatening physical harm to a female victim, T.P., to obstruct T.P.’s free exercise of religion. As part of his plea agreement, Wyatt admitted that he targeted T.P., who is African-American, because of her race. 
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    A former Gulfport, Mississippi, tax return preparer was sentenced to 46 months in prison today for aiding and assisting in the preparation of false returns, announced Principal Deputy Assistant Attorney General Richard E. Zuckerman of the Justice Department’s Tax Division and U.S. Attorney Mike Hurst for the Southern District of Mississippi.
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  • United Airlines to Pay $49 Million to Resolve Criminal Fraud Charges and Civil Claims
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    United Airlines Inc. (United), the world’s third largest airline, has agreed to pay over $49 million to resolve criminal charges and civil claims relating to fraud on postal service contracts for transportation of international mail.
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  • Sexual Harassment: NNSA Could Improve Prevention and Response Efforts in Its Nuclear Security Forces
    In U.S GAO News
    What GAO Found The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA)—within the Department of Energy (DOE)—and its contractors may have limited information on the prevalence of sexual harassment within the nuclear security forces. NNSA's nuclear security forces include federal agents in NNSA's Office of Secure Transportation (OST), which is responsible for transporting nuclear materials, and contracted guard forces at four of its sites. Federal officials at NNSA and contractor representatives at four NNSA sites that process weapons-usable nuclear material reported very few cases of sexual harassment from fiscal years 2015 through 2020. Research shows that the least common response to harassment is to report it or file a complaint. The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC)—which enforces federal laws prohibiting harassment—suggests organizations survey employees to assess the extent to which harassment is a problem in their organization. NNSA does not survey employees on this topic, nor does NNSA call for such surveys in its contracts for security forces. Because NNSA relies solely on reported incidents, it may not have full knowledge into the nature or extent of sexual harassment in OST or by its contractors at its sites. Surveying employees would better position them to identify actions to effectively prevent and respond to harassment. To varying degrees, NNSA and its contractors follow EEOC's recommended practices to prevent and respond to sexual harassment in their nuclear security forces. For example, with respect to recommended training practices, NNSA and its contractors provide antiharassment training to all employees, but only one force offers workplace-specific training that addresses sexual harassment risk factors relevant to the security forces. Because NNSA has not formally reviewed EEOC's practices and considered which to adopt for its nuclear security forces, or made similar considerations for its security force contractors, the agency may be missing opportunities to prevent and respond to sexual harassment. Selected EEOC Practices for Effective Training to Prevent and Respond to Sexual Harassment and Number of NNSA's Nuclear Security Forces That Reflect Those Practices in Training EEOC Promising Practice Number of forces that reflect the practice Provided to employees at every level and location of the organization 5 of 5 Tailored to the specific workplace and workforce 1 of 5 Explains the complaint process, as well as any voluntary alternative dispute resolution processes 2 of 5 Explains the range of possible consequences for engaging in prohibited conduct 1 of 5 Source: GAO comparison of National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and protective force contractor information with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's (EEOC) November 2017 Promising Practices for Preventing Harassment . | GAO-21-307 EEOC has found that NNSA and DOE do not meet all EEOC requirements relevant to preventing and responding to sexual harassment. For example, NNSA does not have an antiharassment program or a compliant antiharassment policy. According to EEOC officials, NNSA and DOE efforts to date have improved some aspects of their EEO programs, but because the agencies have not fully implemented their plans to address deficiencies identified by EEOC, DOE and NNSA may be missing opportunities to establish and maintain effective programs that include protection from and response to sexual harassment. Why GAO Did This Study Federal law prohibits sexual harassment in the workplace. Besides being harmful to those harassed, sexual harassment can decrease organizational performance and increase turnover. In January 2019, public allegations of sexual harassment in NNSA's nuclear security forces drew attention to this issue. House Report 116-120 provided that GAO review sexual harassment in NNSA's nuclear security force. This report examines (1) what NNSA and its contractors know about the prevalence of sexual harassment in their nuclear security forces, (2) the extent to which NNSA and its contractors implement EEOC recommendations to prevent and respond to sexual harassment, and (3) the extent to which EEOC found that NNSA and DOE meet its requirements relevant to sexual harassment. GAO reviewed information on sexual harassment and programs to address such harassment at DOE and NNSA from fiscal years 2015 through 2020. GAO analyzed documents and data, conducted a literature review, interviewed NNSA officials, and compared NNSA and contractor actions with EEOC-recommended practices for preventing harassment.
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  • Acting Assistant Attorney General Brian Rabbitt Delivers Remarks at the PPP Criminal Fraud Enforcement Action Press Conference
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    Over the course of the past six months, the COVID-19 pandemic has wreaked havoc across our country and presented unprecedented challenges for ordinary Americans from all walks of life. 
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  • Agile Assessment Guide: Best Practices for Agile Adoption and Implementation
    In U.S GAO News
    From September 28, 2020 through September 27, 2021, GAO is seeking input and feedback on this Exposure Draft from all interested parties. Please click on this link https://tell.gao.gov/agileguide to provide us with comment on the Guide. The U.S. Government Accountability Office is responsible for, among other things, assisting Congress in its oversight of the executive branch, including assessing federal agencies' management of information technology (IT) systems. The federal government annually spends more than $90 billion on IT. However, federal agencies face challenges in developing, implementing, and maintaining their IT investments. All too frequently, agency IT programs have incurred cost overruns and schedule slippages while contributing little to mission-related outcomes. Accordingly, GAO has included management of IT acquisitions and operations on its High Risk List. Recognizing the severity related to government-wide management of IT, in 2014, the Congress passed and the President signed federal IT acquisition reform legislation commonly referred to as the Federal Information Technology Acquisition Reform Act, or FITARA. This legislation was enacted to improve agencies' acquisition of IT and enable Congress to monitor agencies' progress and hold them accountable for reducing duplication and achieving cost savings. Among its specific provisions is a requirement for Chief Information Officers (CIOs) at covered agencies to certify that certain IT investments are adequately implementing incremental development as defined in the Office of Management and Budget's capital planning guidance. One such framework for incremental development is Agile software development, which has been adopted by many federal agencies. The Agile Assessment Guide discusses best practices that can be used across the federal government for Agile adoption, execution, and program monitoring and control. Use of these best practices should enable government programs to better transition to and manage their Agile programs. GAO has developed this guide to serve multiple audiences: The primary audience for this guide is federal auditors. Specifically, the guide presents best practices that can be used to assess the extent to which an agency has adopted and implemented Agile methods. Organizations and programs that have already established policies and protocols for Agile adoption and execution can use this guide to evaluate their existing approach to Agile software development. Organizations and programs that are in the midst of adopting Agile software development practices and programs that are planning to adopt such practices can also use this guide to inform their transitions. For more information, contact Carol Harris at (202) 512-4456 or harriscc@gao.gov.
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    In Crime News
    Amin Mahdavi, 53, an Iranian national living in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), and Parthia Cargo LLC, a freight forwarding company located in the UAE, were charged in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia with participating in a criminal conspiracy to violate U.S. export laws and sanctions against Iran.
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  • Program Evaluation: Key Terms and Concepts
    In U.S GAO News
    Both the executive branch and congressional committees need evaluative information to help them make decisions about the programs they oversee—information that tells them whether, and why, a program is working well or not. The Government Performance and Results Act of 1993 (GPRA) and GPRA Modernization Act of 2010 (GPRAMA) established a framework for performance management and accountability within the federal government. Building on that foundation, Congress has since passed, among other laws, the Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act of 2018 (Evidence Act) to strengthen the evidence-building efforts of executive branch agencies. This product updates our previous glossary (GAO-11-646SP) to highlight different types of evaluations for answering questions about program performance, as well as relevant issues to ensure study quality. This glossary can help agency officials better understand fundamental concepts related to evaluation and enhance their evidence-building capacity. For more information, contact Lawrance Evans, Jr. at 202-512-2700 or EvansL@gao.gov.
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  • Crumbling Foundations: Extent of Homes with Defective Concrete Is Not Fully Known and Federal Options to Aid Homeowners Are Limited
    In U.S GAO News
    As of December 2019, at least 1,600 homes in Connecticut had confirmed pyrrhotite but the total number of affected homes is likely higher. According to one estimate, 4,000–6,000 more homes in Connecticut could develop crumbling foundations due to pyrrhotite. Affected homeowners may face total remediation costs of $150,000 or more and drops in property values of 25 percent or more. Connecticut established funding to provide homeowners with up to $175,000 towards the cost of foundation replacement, but affected homeowners are typically responsible for about one-third of total repair costs (which can include costs for replacing driveways and porches damaged during foundation replacement). Current funding is expected to assist 1,034 homeowners. Pyrrhotite Damage to a Basement and a Home Being Repaired Due to Pyrrhotite Damage GAO found that highly affected towns lost more than $1.6 million in tax revenue in 2018 due to lost assessment value of the houses affected by pyrrhotite, but town officials told us the losses have not yet significantly affected their budgets. However, officials were concerned that pyrrhotite could have long-term effects on their towns if the number of affected homes increased or homes were not remediated. GAO also found that homes located in highly affected towns and built when pyrrhotite-containing concrete was used sold for significantly less, on average, than similar homes in less-affected towns. Stakeholders told GAO that defaults and foreclosures related to pyrrhotite have been limited to date. Some federal funds have already been used for pyrrhotite testing and GAO identified eight additional federal programs that could be used to help mitigate financial impacts on homeowners. However, most of these programs have eligibility or funding restrictions that limit their potential for this purpose. Stakeholders with whom GAO spoke suggested other federal responses—in particular, declaring pyrrhotite damage a major disaster or establishing a federally backed insurance product. However, the Federal Emergency Management Agency determined that pyrrhotite damage did not qualify as a natural catastrophe, and a federally backed insurance program may not be feasible since it would serve a small population with high expected costs. Certain homes built in northeastern Connecticut and central Massachusetts between 1983 and 2015 have concrete foundations containing the mineral pyrrhotite. Pyrrhotite expands when it is exposed to water and oxygen and, over time, concrete foundations containing pyrrhotite may crack and crumble. The Explanatory Statement accompanying the Consolidated Appropriations Act, 2019 included a provision for GAO to study the financial impact of pyrrhotite. This report describes (1) what is known about the number of homes affected by pyrrhotite in the region; (2) the financial impact of pyrrhotite on homeowners; (3) the financial effects on towns, local housing markets, and the federal government; and (4) federal options to mitigate pyrrhotite's financial impact on affected homeowners. GAO analyzed data from state, local, and private entities about the extent of pyrrhotite in foundations and associated costs, and federal actions taken in response to pyrrhotite. GAO also interviewed federal, state, and local officials; homeowners; and other stakeholders such as banks and real estate agents. For more information, contact John Pendleton at (202) 512-8678 or pendletonj@gao.gov.
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  • Justice Department Acts To Shut Down Fraudulent Websites Exploiting The Covid-19 Pandemic
    In Crime News
    The United States Department of Justice announced today that it has obtained a Temporary Restraining Order in federal court to combat fraud related to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic. The enforcement action, filed in Tampa, Florida, is part of the Justice Department’s ongoing efforts prioritizing the detection, investigation, and prosecution of illegal conduct related to the pandemic. The action was brought based on an investigation conducted by United States Immigration and Customs Enforcement’s (ICE) Homeland Security Investigations (HSI), in coordination with the Vietnam Ministry of Public Security.
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  • Marine Corps Civilian Employee Pleads Guilty to Assaulting His Spouse
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    A civilian employee working for the U.S. Marine Corps Community Association pleaded guilty today to assaulting his spouse while working in Iwakuni, Japan.
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  • Judges, Lawyers Bring Life Skills to Virtual Classroom Activities for Home and School
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    High school teachers can bring real-life civics into their virtual lessons when they invite federal judges and volunteer attorneys to facilitate a civil discourse and decision-making simulation with students at home or in the classroom this fall.
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  • 2020 Census: Key Areas for Attention Raised by Compressed Timeframes
    In U.S GAO News
    In response to the COVID-19 pandemic and an August decision to end data collection about 30 days earlier than planned, the Census Bureau (Bureau) has made late design changes to the 2020 Census. The Bureau also announced it would accelerate its response processing operations, which improve the completeness and accuracy of census results. According to the Bureau, late design changes introduce risk to census quality and costs. The compressed time frames for field operations and data processing raise a number of issues that will require the Bureau's attention. It will be important for the Bureau to hire and retain a sufficient workforce, manage operational changes to the Nonresponse Follow-up operation, ensure census coverage at the local level, evaluate risks in streamlining response processing, and ensure timely and quality processing of census responses. As the 2020 Census continues, GAO will monitor the remainder of field operations and the Bureau's response processing operations.  Like the rest of the country, the Bureau has been required to respond to COVID-19. Resulting delays, compressed time frames, implementation of untested procedures, and continuing challenges could undermine the overall quality of the count and escalate census costs. GAO was asked to testify on its ongoing work on implementation of the 2020 Census. This testimony examines the cost and progress of key 2020 Census operations critical to a cost-effective enumeration. Over the past decade, GAO has made 112 recommendations specific to the 2020 Census. To date, the Bureau has implemented 92. As of September 2020, 19 of the recommendations had not been fully implemented. For more information, contact J. Christopher Mihm at (202)512-6806 or mihmj@gao.gov.
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  • Indiana Man Pleads Guilty to Hate Crime for Making Racially-Charged Motivated Threats Toward Black Neighbor and to Unlawful Possession of Firearms
    In Crime News
    The Justice Department announced today that Shepherd Hoehn, 51, pleaded guilty in federal court to making threats to intimidate and interfere with his neighbor, who is Black, because of the neighbor’s race and because the neighbor was exercising his right to fair housing, in violation of 42 U.S.C. § 3631. Hoehn also pleaded guilty to unlawfully possessing firearms, in violation of 18 U.S.C. § 922(g).
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