October 21, 2021

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Belize Independence Day

12 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government and people of the United States of America, I extend my warmest congratulations to the people of Belize on the momentous occasion of the 40th anniversary of your independence.

The United States joins the people of Belize in celebrating the accomplishments your country has achieved over the past four decades of independence.  Our nations are bound by a strong friendship and partnership, safeguarded by our mutual commitment to democracy, security, and joint prosperity.  We continue to stand with Belize in facing shared challenges such as the COVID-19 pandemic, transnational organized crime, and the climate crisis.

As you celebrate your 40th Independence Day, may the bond between our nations continue to be an example of what is possible through partnership between vibrant democracies with shared values and common goals.

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