September 27, 2021

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Belgium Travel Advisory

13 min read

Reconsider travel to Belgium due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution in Belgium due to terrorism.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Belgium due to COVID-19.

Belgium has resumed most transportation options, (including airport operations and re-opening of borders) and business operations (including day cares and schools). Other improved conditions have been reported within Belgium. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Belgium.

Terrorist groups continue plotting possible attacks in Belgium. Terrorists may attack with little or no warning, targeting tourist locations, transportation hubs, markets/shopping malls, local government facilities, hotels, clubs, restaurants, places of worship, parks, major sporting, music, and cultural events, educational institutions, airports, and other public areas.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to the Belgium:

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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