October 21, 2021

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Barge Company Will Preserve 649 Acres of Habitat and Pay Over $2 Million for Injuries to Natural Resources Resulting from its Oil Spill in the Mississippi River near New Orleans

9 min read
<div>Jeffersonville, Indiana-based American Commercial Barge Line LLC (American Commercial) has agreed to acquire and preserve 649 acres of woodland wildlife habitat near New Orleans, Louisiana and pay over $2 million in damages, in addition to $1.32 million previously paid for damage assessment and restoration planning costs, under the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) and the Louisiana Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act (OSPRA), to resolve federal and State claims for injuries to natural resources resulting from an oil spill from one of its barges.</div>
Jeffersonville, Indiana-based American Commercial Barge Line LLC (American Commercial) has agreed to acquire and preserve 649 acres of woodland wildlife habitat near New Orleans, Louisiana and pay over $2 million in damages, in addition to $1.32 million previously paid for damage assessment and restoration planning costs, under the Oil Pollution Act (OPA) and the Louisiana Oil Spill Prevention and Response Act (OSPRA), to resolve federal and State claims for injuries to natural resources resulting from an oil spill from one of its barges.

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