[Protest of GSA Contract Award for Office Space]

A firm protested the General Services Administration (GSA) decision to increase its required office space under an existing contract, contending that since GSA failed to afford it an opportunity to bid on the additional space, GSA should: (1) resolicit its requirements; and (2) allow it an opportunity to bid on the current requirements. GAO held that it would not consider the protest, since there was a pending appeal concerning the initial award of the lease, which could ultimately render any GAO decision academic. Accordingly, the protest was dismissed.

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