Attorney General Merrick Garland Addresses the 115,000 Employees of the Department of Justice on His First Day

Former Acting U.S. Attorney General Monty Wilkinson’s Remarks

Good morning.

It’s my honor to welcome Merrick Garland back to the Department of Justice as the 86th Attorney General of the United States. I’d also like to recognize the Attorney General’s wife Lynn, his brother-in-law Mitchell and his nieces Laura and Andrea.

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