September 22, 2021

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Attorney General Merrick B. Garland Delivers Remarks at the 2021 International Association of Chiefs of Police Conference

18 min read
<div>Good morning. It is a privilege to speak to the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) – you are an extraordinary organization, comprised of global leaders of one of the world’s most critical professions. </div>
Good morning. It is a privilege to speak to the International Association of Chiefs of Police (IACP) – you are an extraordinary organization, comprised of global leaders of one of the world’s most critical professions. 

More from: September 13, 2021

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