Aryeh Lightstone Designated as U.S. Special Envoy for Economic Normalization

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

I am pleased to announce that I have designated Aryeh Lightstone to serve as the U.S. Special Envoy for Economic Normalization. As special envoy, Aryeh Lightstone will represent U.S. interests in normalizing economic relations between Israel and the UAE, Bahrain, Sudan, Kosovo, and Morocco. Designating Mr. Lightstone as Special Envoy will contribute to the speed and the efficiency of the normalization process and create momentum for the Abraham Accords. I am confident other countries will be encouraged to join and solidify the Accords against the outside factors that seek to undermine them.

More from: Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

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