October 26, 2021

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Aruba National Day

15 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States Government, I congratulate the people of Aruba on your National Day celebrating the 35th anniversary of Aruba’s Status Aparte.

We appreciate the strong economic and cultural ties between our two countries, and we commend Aruba’s dedication to moving forward on the important initiatives we share despite uncertainty caused by the pandemic. This past year, working together, we established Aruba’s first EducationUSA Advising Center, which will increase higher education opportunities in the United States for Aruban students.  U.S. investments in Aruba’s energy sector have the potential to lower energy costs, provide for a more environmentally sustainable energy mix, and help Aruba diversify its economy. Cooperation with the U.S. Customs and Border Protection program continues to facilitate secure travel.

With the strong relationship that we enjoy in mind, we wish all Arubans a happy National Anthem and Flag Day.

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