September 27, 2021

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Arrest of Eight Pan-Democratic Politicians in Hong Kong

16 min read

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

The United States strongly condemns the arrests of eight pan-democratic politicians in Hong Kong, including five sitting members of the Legislative Council. The arrest of these lawmakers six months after the incident in question is a clear abuse of law enforcement for political purposes. The Hong Kong government’s harassment and intimidation of pro-democracy representatives and attempts to stifle dissent are stark examples of its ongoing complicity with the authoritarian Chinese Communist Party, which seeks to dismantle the promised autonomy of Hong Kong and eviscerate respect for human rights. We call on Beijing and the Hong Kong government to respect the right of the Hong Kong people to air their grievances through their elected representatives. The United States stands with the people of Hong Kong.

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