September 22, 2021

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Andorra’s National Day

6 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

On behalf of the United States of America, I congratulate the people of Andorra as they celebrate their patron saint, Our Lady of Meritxell.

This year marks 21 years since Andorra began its participation in the Fulbright Program, the U.S. government’s flagship international educational exchange effort.  More than 80 Andorran and U.S. alumni have participated in the program over the last two decades.  Their academic collaboration and cultural exchanges reflect the many values that our two countries share, including the promotion of democracy and human rights.  Even as the world continues to battle the COVID-19 pandemic, we look forward to deepening our friendship and cooperation with Andorra.

My best wishes to the people of Andorra for a joyous national day and a successful year ahead.

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