September 27, 2021

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Albania Travel Advisory

12 min read

Reconsider travel to Albania due to COVID-19. Exercise increased caution due to crime.

Read the Department of State’s COVID-19 page before you plan any international travel. 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) has issued a Level 3 Travel Health Notice for Albania due to COVID-19.

Albania has lifted stay at home orders, and resumed some transportation options and business operations. Visit the Embassy’s COVID-19 page for more information on COVID-19 in Albania.

Exercise increased caution in:

  • The southern town of Lazarat due to crime.

Read the country information page.

If you decide to travel to Albania:

Lazarat–Exercise Increased Caution

The security situation in Lazarat remains volatile due to crime and violence associated with marijuana cultivation. Local police have limited ability to protect and assist travelers.

The U.S. government is unable to provide emergency services to U.S. citizens in Lazarat as U.S government employees are prohibited from traveling there.

Last Update: Reissued with updates to COVID-19 information.

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