September 22, 2021

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Additional Departures of U.S. Citizens and Lawful Permanent Residents from Afghanistan

11 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

As part of our ongoing commitment, today we facilitated the departure from Afghanistan of 21 U.S. citizens and 11 Lawful Permanent Residents (LPRs).

Specifically, the Department assisted two U.S. citizens and 11 LPRs depart Afghanistan via an overland route. We provided guidance to them, worked to facilitate their safe passage, and Embassy officials greeted them once they had crossed the border. Additionally, another Qatar Airways charter flight departed Kabul with 19 U.S. citizens aboard. While we offered seats to 44 U.S. citizens, not all of them chose to travel. We are deeply grateful to the continued efforts of Qatar in facilitating limited operations at Kabul International Airport and helping to ensure the safety of these flights.

We continue to make good on our pledge to U.S. citizens, LPRs, and Afghans to whom we have a special commitment. We will be relentless in helping them depart Afghanistan if they choose to do so.

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