September 22, 2021

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 Acting UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General Stephanie Turco Williams 

6 min read

Antony J. Blinken, Secretary of State

The United States thanks Stephanie Turco Williams for her service in advancing peace as she departs her position as Acting UN Special Representative of the Secretary-General (SRSG) and Head of the UN Support Mission in Libya (UNSMIL).  In these roles, she displayed extraordinary diplomatic skills, demonstrating both creativity and tenacity to bring together Libyan parties within the framework of the UN-facilitated political process, resulting in the October 23 nationwide ceasefire agreement, the selection of leadership for a new executive authority, and the decision to hold national elections by the end of this year.  As the leadership of UNSMIL transitions, we encourage the Libyan people to build upon their achievements and continue working towards ending the conflict.  The United States supports the Libyan vision of a peaceful, prosperous, and unified Libya with an inclusive government that can both secure the country and meet the economic and humanitarian needs of its people. Ms. Williams’ service contributed to the realization of this vision, and she deserves our deepest gratitude.

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