September 25, 2021

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Statement of the Acting Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen on the Death of Former Attorney General Richard (Dick) Thornburgh

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<div>Acting Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen released the following statement: It is with profound sadness that I learned of the passing of former Attorney General and Pennsylvania Governor Richard (Dick) L. Thornburgh. Gov. Thornburgh’s tenure at the Department of Justice started in 1969 in the Western District of Pennsylvania, where he served as the U.S. Attorney.</div>

Acting Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen released the following statement: 

“Acting Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen released the following statement: Acting Attorney General Jeffrey A. Rosen released the following statement on the death of former Attorney General Richard (Dick) Thornburgh: It is with profound sadness that I learned of the passing of former Attorney General and Pennsylvania Governor Richard (Dick) L. Thornburgh. Gov. Thornburgh’s tenure at the Department of Justice started in 1969 in the Western District of Pennsylvania, where he served as the U.S. Attorney.  He later led the Department’s Criminal Division before successfully running for Governor of Pennsylvania, where he served two terms as the Keystone state’s chief executive.  In 1988, President Ronald Reagan appointed Gov. Thornburgh to serve as the U.S. Attorney General and he was retained as Attorney General by President George H.W. Bush.  Gov. Thornburgh was widely respected as a brilliant lawyer, a true patriot and a model leader. He led the efforts on the Americans with Disabilities Act, launched campaign against white collar crime– including a record number of cases against savings and loans and securities officials, and he actively pursued racial, religious and ethnic hate crimes.  His contributions to the Nation, our Department and the legal profession are legendary and the memory of his contributions will live on for generations to come.”

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