October 19, 2021

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2021 Australia-U.S. Ministerial Consultations

26 min read

Office of the Spokesperson

Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken and Secretary of Defense Lloyd Austin will meet with Australian Foreign Minister Marise Payne and Defense Minister Peter Dutton on Thursday, September 16, when they co-host the 2021 Australia-U.S. Ministerial (AUSMIN) consultations at the Department of State.

The meetings provide an opportunity for the United States and Australia to discuss ways in which our two countries can cooperate on strengthening peace and security in the Indo-Pacific region and beyond.

Before the meetings, there will be an AUSMIN principals photo spray at 9 a.m. in the Benjamin Franklin Room at the Department of State. This event will be pooled press coverage only.

The Secretaries and Ministers will participate in a joint press availability on the outcomes of this year’s ministerial meeting at 1:30 p.m. The press availability will take place in the Department of State’s Dean Acheson Auditorium following the AUSMIN meetings. This event will be pooled press coverage only and livestreamed on www.state.gov.

For more information, please contact the Bureau of East Asian and Pacific Affairs at EAP-Press@state.gov.

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