12th Annual HBCU Foreign Policy Conference

Ned Price, Department Spokesperson

The Department of State was delighted to host the 12th Historical Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU) Foreign Policy Conference last week. Department leaders discussed U.S. foreign policy priorities with students from HBCUs, while also sharing information about the Department’s educational programs and career options. In his welcoming remarks, Secretary Blinken emphasized the importance of diversity and inclusion at the State Department, describing it as an institution that values the contributions of people of all backgrounds, regardless of race, ethnicity, gender, religion, or national origin. As the Secretary said, “Diversity makes any organization stronger – and for the State Department, it’s mission-critical. We are representing the United States, and we need a workforce that reflects the diverse country we are.”

The Biden-Harris Administration  has made clear that diversity, inclusion, equity, and accessibility are top priorities, and it is committed to ensuring our institutions and our workforce reflect the full strength and diversity of our country.

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  • Vermont Man Charged with Hiring Person to Kidnap and Kill a Man in a Foreign Country, and Producing and Receiving Child Pornography
    In Crime News
    A federal grand jury in the District of Vermont returned a third superseding indictment today against a Burlington man for conspiring to kidnap and kill a man in a foreign country, murder for hire, and five child pornography offenses.
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