10th Anniversary of the Revolution in Tunisia

Michael R. Pompeo, Secretary of State

On behalf of the Government of the United States of America, I congratulate the Tunisian people on the 10th anniversary of Tunisia’s revolution. Our partnership is strong, dating back centuries to the 1797 Treaty of Peace and Friendship between our two countries. The United States views Tunisia as a partner of choice, our relationship grounded in our shared commitment to democratic values and the promotion of economic prosperity for our peoples.  We are proud to have stood by the Tunisian people in the last decade as they became an example of an inclusive democracy, one where the rights of women and minorities and freedom of speech and association are constitutionally respected. That Tunisia received the Nobel Peace Prize for dialogue and peace is a testimony to the true character of the Tunisian people.

Since the start of the revolution, U.S.-supported projects have created thousands of jobs, opened new markets to Tunisian goods, educated and registered voters, and invested in Tunisia’s people.  Together, we face global challenges and stand strong against the threat of terrorism.  Looking forward, we remain committed to standing by the Tunisian people to create jobs, engage the private sector, and strengthen democratic institutions and rule of law .  We look forward to preserving the gains made over the last ten years and to working together to foster economic prosperity across Tunisia.

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